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Andrew Yang takes lead in California data privacy measure

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The Fitbits on our wrists collect our health and fitness data; Apple promises privacy but lots of iPhone apps can still share our personal information; and who really knows what they’re agreeing to when a website asks, “Do You Accept All Cookies?” Most people just click “OK” and hope for the best, says former Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang.

“The amount of data we’re giving up is unprecedented in human history,” says Yang, who lives in New York but is helping lead the campaign for a data privacy initiative on California’s Nov. 3 ballot. “Don’t you think it’s time we did something about it?”

Yang is chairing the advisory board for Proposition 24, which he and other supporters see as a model for other states as the U.S. tries to catch up with protections that already exist in Europe.

The California Privacy Rights Act of 2020

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Twitter is changing how it crops photos after reports of racial bias

  • Twitter said it is limiting its reliance on machine learning that helps it decide which part of a photo to crop on its platform.
  • Online users have reported racial bias on the social media firm’s image cropping tool, which automatically focuses on the part of a photo it thinks the viewer will find most interesting.
  • One Twitter user recently highlighted how the face of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who is white, was routinely centered in automatic image crops, while that of former President Barack Obama was cut out.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Twitter is making changes to its photo cropping function after an investigation into racial bias in the software, the company said on Thursday.

The announcement comes after users on the platform repeatedly showed that the tool — which uses machine learning to choose which part of an image to crop based on what

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Cults and Cognition: Programming the True Believer

Public Domain Vectors

Source: Public Domain Vectors

In 1971, a messianic figure, Jim Jones, persuaded a great number of his followers to commit suicide, which the victims termed a “revolutionary act.” Revolution against whom or what was not specified. 

In 1993, Branch Davidians followed another messianic leader, David Koresh, into a compound at Waco, Texas, with misplaced faith and automatic weapons. Many of the faithful were killed in an epic standoff with law enforcement. 

And in 1997, a former music professor named Applewhite persuaded 38 people to commit suicide with him, with plastic bags and purple cloths over their heads and Nike sneakers on their feet, in an effort to reach a UFO hiding behind Comet Hale-Bopp. This UFO was to take them, via what they termed Heaven’s Gate, to an unspecified interplanetary reward. 

“Nike” is Greek for “victory.” Dying with your head in a plastic bag doesn’t seem especially victorious. 

Now, if

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Survey: Many feel their current internet is too slow and overpriced, yet few have upgraded

Three-quarters of respondents didn’t know what internet speeds would be adequate for their household and the overwhelming majority have yet to upgrade their service.

remote work

Image: iStock/GaudiLab

To mitigate the spread of COVID-19, companies around the globe adopted remote work policies in recent months. At the same time, many schools and universities are conducting classes virtually to ensure the safety of students and staff this fall. Needless to say, this en masse shift to distanced learning and telecommuting has increased the need for high-speed internet for millions. A new survey analyzes consumers’ sentiment regarding their current internet capabilities, bandwidth needs, provider pricing expectations, and more.

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On Monday, HighSpeedInternet.com, a site to explore and compare internet providers,  released a report detailing the results of a recent anonymous US survey involving 1,000 people. Overall, three-quarters of those surveyed

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